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Saturday, September 1, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Football vs. The Citadel (Athletics)
Description: Football opens the season with their first home game against The Citadel! Check out https://www.ticketreturn.com/prod2/team.asp?SponsorID=11787#.W2nmoVVKiUk to get tickets, or stop by the Ticket Office! Free t-shirts and schedule magnets while supplies last! See you at Gibbs Stadium! 
Location: Gibbs Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
Monday, September 3, 2018
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
First Campus Union Meeting, Leonard Auditorium (Student Life)
Description: Come join the 2018-2019 Campus Union for the First Meeting of the school year. We will be discussing our agenda and strategic vision for the year. New legislation will be debated as well. It is an excellent option first year for any first year students considering running or any students looking to get involved!
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: Mattie Weldon
Tuesday, September 4, 2018
11:00 AM - Noon
Opening Convocation, Leonard Auditorium (Academic)
Description: 2018-19 Opening Convocation
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: Kris Wright
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Welcome Home Dinner for Study Abroad Returnees, Papadopoulos (Academic)
Description: Students who studied abroad during the summer and spring 2018 are invited to attend.
Location: Papadopoulos
Contact: Amy Lancaster
7:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Procrastination Tuesday, Olin Theater (Other)
Description: Everyone procrastinates, so why not do it with a group? Come and enjoy an evening of laughter with the Geek Guild as we watch the first few episodes from two different anime. All are invited to attend
Location: Olin Theater
Contact: Christopher Overton
Wednesday, September 5, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
6:00 PM
Wofford Theatre Open House and Auditions, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Interested in getting involved in the Theatre Department at Wofford? Want to learn more about what’s coming up this season, and about how you can help? Please join us for an Open House on Sept. 5 at 6 PM in the Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre! Meet the faculty, staff, and students who make up the vibrant and growing theatre community on campus, learn more about opportunities to get involved both onstage and off, and enjoy some delicious treats while you’re at it!

 

After the Open House, all are welcome to join us in the Jerome Johnson Richardson Theatre at 7 PM for auditions for our fall play, The Danube, written by Maria Irene Fornes and directed by Prof. Dan Day. Auditions will include cold readings from the script, and all auditionees are also invited to prepare and memorize two contrasting, contemporary monologues from American playwrights, no more than one minute long each. Note that monologues are required for all students who are currently pursuing or who plan to declare a major or minor in Theatre; please prepare new material that you have not used for previous auditions, classes, or productions at Wofford. Monologues are optional for all others.

 

Performance dates for The Danube are Nov. 7-10 and 14-17, and rehearsals begin early in September.

 

We hope to see you at one or both of these exciting events!

Location: Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
Contact: Miriam Thomas
Thursday, September 6, 2018
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:15 PM - 5:00 PM
January internship information session, McMillan Theater (Academic)
Description: If you're interested in doing an internship for this coming interim, this is the session for you.  An overview of all the opportunities will be given, with a special emphasis on the Learning Work interim (JAN 389).  If you are unable to make this meeting, another one will be offered from 11-12 on Tuesday, September 11th.  If you are unable to make either meeting, please contact Dr. Anderson (Interim Coordinator) so that he can give you the basics about January internships for 2019.
Location: McMillan Theater
Contact: A. K. Anderson
Friday, September 7, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
5:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Backyard BBQ and Basketball Tournament, Phase 3 In The Village (Student Life)
Description: Start the semester off right with good food and good competition sponsored by the Black Student Alliance! Join us for a 3v3 basketball tournament and all the burgers, hot dogs, and fixings you can eat! The tournament champs will take home ALL the bragging rights and a Grand Prize! Tickets are $3 for all you can eat grilled food buffet style. Team registration is $15 and includes food tickets for the whole team!  Full court play, 4 person max roster per team, streetball rules and regulations. Come out ready to show out!
Location: Phase 3 courts, The village
Contact: Kaycia Best
10:00 PM - 11:55 PM
Heat Wave: Back to Campus Edition, Meadors Multicultural House, Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village (Student Life)
Description: Wofford Women of Color, the Association of Multicultural and the Organization for Latin American Students presents Heat Wave: Back to Campus Edition! This event is a semester kickoff party with a twist. We'll be jamming to sounds of new wave music from Africa, Latin America and U.S. Join us at 10 p.m. Sept. 7 at 10pm in the Meadors Multicultural House in the Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village! Don't miss out!
Location: Meadors Multicultural House, Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village
Contact: Nneka Mogbo
Saturday, September 8, 2018
(All Day)
Fall Hospitality Day 1, Papadopoulos Room (Admission)
Location: Papadopoulos Room
Contact: Mary Carman Jordan
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Football vs. VMI (Athletics)
Description: Football hosts VMI at 1:30 PM! Check out https://www.ticketreturn.com/prod2/team.asp?SponsorID=11787#.W2nmoVVKiUk to get tickets, or stop by the Ticket Office! See you at Gibbs Stadium! 
Location: Gibbs Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
Monday, September 10, 2018
11:45 AM - 1:00 PM
Meet and Greet: Staff, faculty and coaches monthly luncheons, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description:  We will meet to build relationships and get to know each other in Gray Jones from 11:45am till 1:00pm. Two more meetings during the Fall semester are scheduled for October 10 and November 7. Free lunch is provided thank you to the office of the Provost. We will be celebrating retired colleagues. 
Location: Gray Jones (Burwell downstairs)- Free food
Contact: Begona Caballero-Garcia
6:00 PM
Campus Union Meeting, Olin 101 (Student Life)
Location: Olin Building, Olin 101
Contact: Beth Clardy
Tuesday, September 11, 2018
(All Day)
Deadline for securing independent interim sponsor (Academic)
Description: If you are wanting to pursue an independent interim in January 2019, you must have secured a faculty sponsor by this date.  The deadline for proposals is Tuesday, September 25th, and the two week period between now and then is needed to work with your faculty sponsor on that proposal.  The relevant online information begins at the following link, which distinguishes between internship interims and independent interims:  http://www.wofford.edu/interim/create/
 
Contact: A. K. Anderson
11:00 AM - Noon
January internship information session, McMillan Theater (Academic)
Description: If you're interested in doing an internship for this coming interim, this is the session for you.  An overview of all the opportunities will be given, with a special emphasis on the Learning Work interim (JAN 389).  If you are unable to make this meeting, an earlier one will be offered from 4:15-5:00 on Thursday, September 6th.  If you are unable to make either meeting, please contact Dr. Anderson (Interim Coordinator) so that he can give you the basics about January internships for 2019.
Location: McMillan Theater
Contact: A. K. Anderson
11:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Mass Meditation, Lawn in front of Main Building (Other)
Description:

Take some time for yourself and join The Space and The Wellness Center for a mass meditation on the lawn of Old Main.  Sept 11, 2018 11:15 – 11:45.  Meditation has been proven to improve focus and relieve stress.  Bring a towel and participate in a guided meditation.

Location: Old Main
Contact: Curt McPhail
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Pre-Law Welcome Lunch, Papadopolous Room (Academic)
Description: Please join us for lunch (Taco Dog) in the Papadopolous Room (Admissions Office) on Tuesday, Sept 11th from 11:15am to 12:30pm.  This is a great opportunity to meet the faculty advisors and student officers for pre-law as well as other students interested in applying to law school.  We will go over our calendar of upcoming events as well as information important to law school for students each of their academic years at Wofford.  Look forward to seeing you there.  
Location: Papadopolous Room
Contact: David Alvis
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Wednesday, September 12, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Canceled: Therapy Dogs, Front of Main Building (Student Life)
Description: Therapy dogs here to give you a little taste of some 4-legged love!  Come give a dog a hug.
 The dogs will be on the seal of Old Main from 5-6:30 on Wednesday. September 12. 
Location: in front of Old Main
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
Thursday, September 13, 2018
10:50 AM - Noon
Interim 2019 Travel/Study Fair, Main Bldg. (Academic)
Description: The Interim 2019 Travel/Study Fair will take place on Thursday, September 13 from 10:50am - noon on the top steps of Main Building. Faculty sponsors will be giving information sessions about their travel projects at 11:00am and 11:30am. This is a great way to learn more about Interim 2019 travel/study projects. We'll see you there!
Location: Main Building
Contact: International Programs
11:00 AM - 12:40 PM
New Faculty Luncheon, Holcombe Room, Burwell Building (Academic)
Description: The first New Faculty Mentoring Lunch of the 2018-2019 academic year will occur from 11 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. Thursday, Sept. in the Holcombe Room. The topic for the luncheon will be the Honor Code.

This lunch series serves as a mentoring program for junior faculty but any faculty or staff member is welcome to attend. Lunches for faculty in their first and second years of employment are paid for by the Provost's Office; other faculty members who are attending can purchase lunch from the Faculty and Staff Dining Room or bring a bag lunch. Anyone who has a meeting at the 11 a.m. hour is welcome to join us after their meeting concludes.
Location: Holcombe Room, Burwell Building
Contact: Stefanie Baker
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
9:00 PM - 11:55 PM
Sliding and Shagging, Seal of Main Bldg. (Student Life)
Description: Come out and enjoy a night of sliders and shagging on the seal of Main Bldg.! Hosted by WAC! 
Location: Seal of Old Main
Contact: Isabella Riddler
Friday, September 14, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Saturday, September 15, 2018
Noon - 2:00 PM
Volleyball vs. MTSU (Athletics)
Description: Volleyball hots MTSU at 10:00 AM! 
Location: Jerry Richardson Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Monday, September 17, 2018
6:00 PM
Campus Union Meeting, Olin 101 (Student Life)
Location: Olin Building, Olin Rm. 101
Contact: Beth Clardy
Tuesday, September 18, 2018
11:00 AM
Constitution Day Lecture: "The Constitution in the Career of a Federal Judge," Senior Judge Dennis Shedd. Leonard Auditorium, Main Building (multiple cals)
Description:

Senior Judge Dennis Shedd, a 1975 Wofford graduate, has served on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit since 2001. He received an honorary degree from Wofford at the 2018 Commencement Exercises. He was nominated as a U.S. District Court judge by President George H.W. Bush in 1990, and in 2001 was nominated by President George W. Bush to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. He has served as a federal judge for more than a quarter-century. He received the Order of the Palmetto, the highest award for a civilian in South Carolina, earlier this year.

Location: Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Contact: David Alvis
11:45 AM - 12:50 PM
Teaching and Inclusivity group (former Inclusive Pedagogy) for faculty and staff interested in teaching, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description:

Please come to have a free lunch and discussion about what specific tools and strategies can we all do in our classrooms to support our less privileged students, some of them first generation students. The article published in the Chronicle of Higher Education titled “Traditional Teaching May Deepen Inequality. Can a Different Approach Fix It?” is fascinating and gives a lot of good advice. No problem if you don't have time to read the article, come anyway.  I also hope we can brainstorm other ideas we could implement at Wofford to help our students. 


https://www.chronicle.com/article/Traditional-Teaching-May/243339?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en&elqTrackId=d9bc9e4ee59f4eea9168c9f5d77010ed&elq=f4d303b52d944812911287a0030a0eb4&elqaid=18996&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=8587

 

Location: Holcombe
Contact: Begona Caballero-Garcia
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Hispanic Heritage Month Kick-Off Celebration, Burwell Dining Hall (Student Life)
Description:

Please join us for great music with DJ Breezy and great food prepared by AVI! OLAS will be conducting a trivia session for prizes such as gift cards and a pair of Panthers tickets. 

Location: Burwell Dining Hall
Contact: Demario Watts
6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Kredit with Kal, RMSC 122 (Student Life)
Description: Personal Finance and Credit are among some of the most important things a person can understand when focusing on their financial health and well-being. Join us for a brief presentation on how credit works, when it should or should not used, and general advice on how college students can better understand what their credit score means. Refreshments will be provided.
Location: Milliken 122
Contact: Kalvin Guyer
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Long Term Environmental Reflection, Arts, and the Humanities: The View from Shaver's Creek, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description:

A talk by Ian Marshall (Penn State-Altoona) and David Taylor (SU-Stony Brook) about the new Wofford Long Term Environmental Reflection program and the Shaver’s Creek LTER anthology.   https://www.psupress.org/books/titles/978-0-271-08020-8.html



 
 


Location: Gray-Jones Room, Burwell Building
Contact: John Lane
Wednesday, September 19, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Panhellenic Meet and Greek Ice Cream Social, Greek Pavilion (Student Life)
Description: This event is open for all women interested in or planning to participate in Spring 2019 recruitment. We will have an ice cream truck with free ice cream for both potential new members and Panhellenic women. This will serve as an opportunity for potential new members to interact with Greek women in a neutral environment, as all four sororities will be represented, and to simply get to know other women on campus. 
Location: Greek Pavilion
Contact: Samantha Hubbard
8:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Knitty Gritty Interest Meeting, Olin 116 (Student Life)
Description: Do you love knit or crochet, or would you like to learn how? Do you want to learn a new skill and a method to decrease stress? Do you want to help the community through crafting? If so, stop by our interest meeting to learn more!
Location: Olin 116
Contact: Erin Bedenbaugh
Thursday, September 20, 2018
(All Day)
Interim 2019 Travel/Study Deadline (Academic)
Description: Students planning to apply for a travel/study project should submit all materials online by midnight.
Contact: Office of International Programs
Noon - 1:00 PM
Multicultural women + allies group for faculty, staff and coaches, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description:

This is a safe zone group for women with diverse backgrounds and interests to support, collaborate with, and help each other.  Allies are welcome!  Two more meetings with this group are scheduled for October 19 and November 30. 

 

 

Location: Gray Jones (Burwell downstairs)
Contact: Begona Caballero-Garcia
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Friday, September 21, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Mid Autumn Festival Celebration, The Pavilion (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description: The Chinese Program would like to invite you to join The Mid-Autumn Festival (also known as The Moon Festival). It is one of the most important and broadly celebrated holidays in East Asian, Southeast Asian, and their oversea communities. This festival commemorates the autumn harvest while enjoying a full moon with family and friends. It is similar to Thanksgiving in U.S and is celebrated on the 15th day of August in the lunar calendar. This year it takes place on Monday, September 24th. Our celebration event will take place Friday, September 21st (the Roman version), 2018, from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at the Pavilion. Please join us for Chinese food, moon cake, fruits, games, and crafting activities. This event is open to the public. 
Location: The Pavilion
Contact: Dr. Yongfang Zhang
Saturday, September 22, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Monday, September 24, 2018
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Gold Week Day 1 - Cancer Sucks, campus dining facilities (Student Life)
Description: The sisters of Delta Delta Delta will be handing out free suckers and lollipops outside the dining halls to kick off Gold Week. September is Childhood Cancer Awareness month so be sure to grab a flyer for a list of events throughout the week, month, and semester. 
Location: Campus dining facilities
Contact: Emily Ledford
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Introduction to Leading a Faculty-Led Program, Olin 118 (Academic)
Description: Faculty who are interested in learning more about leading a faculty-led study abroad program are encouraged to attend this informational workshop. We'll discuss various models for taking students abroad, timelines, budgeting, marketing, and health & safety considerations.
Location: Olin 118
Contact: Laura Braun
6:00 PM
Campus Union Meeting, Olin 101 (Student Life)
Location: Olin Building, Olin Rm. 101
Contact: Beth Clardy
Tuesday, September 25, 2018
(All Day)
Independent interim deadline (Academic)
Description: The deadline for independent interim proposals for January 2019 is by 11:59PM this evening (Sept. 25th).  Proposals received after the deadline will not be considered by the Interim Committee.  Students need to have secured a faculty sponsor for their project two weeks prior to this date (Tuesday, September 11th.)  The needed online information about independent interims begins with the following link, which distinguishes between independent interims and internship interims:  http://www.wofford.edu/interim/create/
 
Contact: A. K. Anderson
11:00 AM - Noon
Cindy Hipps talk on Bystander Intervention and Hazing (Student Life)
Description: Cindy Hipps lost her son Tucker Hipps on September 22, 2014 in a hazing incident at Clemson University. She will speak to the Wofford community about hazing, bystander intervention, and being there for each other. 
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: Matthew Hammett
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Rapid Research Round-up, Room 122 Milliken Science Building (Academic)
Description: Learn about research conducted by Wofford Biology students during the summer of 2018 and how you can find similar opportunities.  
Location: Room 122 Milliken Science Building
Contact: Chuck Smith
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Wednesday, September 26, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
5:30 PM
The Role of the Arts in Elevating Hispanic/Latinx Voices, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts (Academic)
Description:

Ivan Segura from Palmetto Luna Arts will be giving a talk on the role of the arts in elevating Hispanic/Latinx voices in South Carolina. Following the talk, an artistic piece will be created. Hors d'oeuvre and light refreshments will be provided. Sponsored by OLAS and the Presidential Committee on Diversity and Inclusion with the support of Dr. Youmi Efurd.

 

Location: Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
Contact: Dr. Ramon Galinanes, Jr.
Thursday, September 27, 2018
11:00 AM - Noon
Sleep Tight Terriers, Anna Todd Wofford Center (Student Life)
Description: Why do you need sleep?  How does sleep help you in college?  Come listen to the Spartanburg Sleep Center talk about sleep and the benefits you can gain from a good nights sleep.  Free prizes to the first ones to arrive. 
11:00 in Anna Todd  
Location: Anna Todd Wofford Center
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Book club for faculty and staff: White fragility by Robin DiAngelo, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description: As part of the Inclusive Pedagogy Book Club series, we will be discussing White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo.  This acclaimed sociologist will be at Wofford on October 16 and 17. Dr. Rhiannon Leebrick will be leading this meeting. All faculty and staff are welcome to join. Please contact Begońa Caballero-Garcia before Sep. 20th if you would like a copy of the book. Free lunch for all attendees. 
Location: Gray Jones (Burwell downstairs)- Free food
Contact: Begona Caballero-Garcia
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Friday, September 28, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Memorial Service for Dr. John Pilley, Leonard Auditorium, Main Building (multiple cals)
Description: Wofford will host a memorial service for Dr. John Pilley, professor emeritus of psychology and owner/trainer of Chaser the border collie. Dr. Pilley died June 17, 2018, at the age of 89.

The service is open to the campus community as well as the general public.

A reception will follow the service in the Papadopoulos Room. All are invited.
Location: Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Contact: Laura Corbin
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Reception in honor of the late Dr. John Pilley, Papadopoulos Room, Papadopoulos Building (multiple cals)
Description: A reception will be held from 5 to 6 p.m. in honor of the late Dr. John Pilley, professor emeritus of psychology, who died June 17. The reception follows a 4 p.m. memorial service in Leonard Auditorium in Main Building.

The campus community and the general public are invited to the memorial service and the reception.
Location: Papadopoulos Room, Papadopoulos Building
Contact: Laura Corbin
Saturday, September 29, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: The Richardson Family Art Gallery features the works by Kaye Savage and Colleen Balance (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Kaye Savage, interested in chemical, physical, and biological interactions across different scales of time and space, in Earth’s surficial environments, presents both place-based, incorporating terrain patterns and natural materials from sites that she explores, and data-based, depicting patterns observed by herself  or by scientists that she meets in the field, as graphic elements. Her pieces engage with locations from the Blue Ridge to the South Carolina coast. 

For Ballance, It has been more than a bit of a stretch to return to her roots as an artist and attempt to create work not based on theatrical text.  However, once she worked with her watercolor guru, and traveled to Morocco and southern Spain to further her MENA studies, she was fortunate to find the inspiration she needed. The Saharan sand of Erg Chebbi and the miraculous decorative tile motifs at the Alhambra and madrasas of Fes provided her the mental freshness and soul touching spark to produce what viewers can find in her works.  

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
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