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Previous Period  Week of Sunday, August 26, 2018    Next Period 
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Sunday, August 26, 2018
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Women's Soccer vs. Akron (Athletics)
Description: Women's Soccer vs. Akron at 2:00 PM. Admission is free! Come celebrate National Dog Day with your T-Dogs and the first 25 fans who bring their dog(s) to Snyder Field will receive a Wofford Dog Bandanna! 
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
Monday, August 27, 2018
10:00 AM - Noon
Advisors Meeting: Organization for fall 2018, Olin 101 (Academic)
Description: General education advisors will meet to prepare for Fall Orientation commitments and to look ahead to fall 2018 advising.
Location: Olin 101
Contact: Carol B. Wilson
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Soccer vs. UNC Asheville (Athletics)
Description: Men's Soccer hosts UNC Asheville at 7:00 PM. Admission is free! Wear your Wofford Pride to Snyder Field and and receive a free pop socket or koozie! 
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
Tuesday, August 28, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Wednesday, August 29, 2018
8:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Class of 2022 Move-in, The Commons, Campus Life Building (Student Life)
Description: All New Resident Students Check-in 
Location: The Commons, Campus Life Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM
New Commuting Students Check-in, The Commons, Campus Life Building (Student Life)
Location: The Commons, Campus Life Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
3:30 PM
Opening Session for New Students & Parents, Front Lawn, Main Building (Student Life)
Location: Front Lawn, Main Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
4:15 PM
Class of 2022 Community Life I: Academic & Personal Success: Responsibility & Honor, Leonard Auditorium (Student Life)
Location: Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
6:15 PM
Picnic Dinner for all new students & families, Front Lawn of Main Building (Student Life)
Location: Front Lawn, Burwell Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
7:00 PM
Dessert Reception for New Students & Families, Front Lawn of President's Home (Student Life)
Location: Front Lawn of the President's Home
Contact: Beth Clardy
8:00 PM
Community Life II: Campus Life - Class of 2022, Leonard Auditorium, Main Building (Student Life)
Location: Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
9:30 PM
Class of 2022 FY Orientation Meeting, Main Building (Student Life)
Location: Main Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
10:00 PM
First Night Social, Class of 2022, Richardson Family Pavilion, Greek Village (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Family Pavilion, Greek Village
Contact: Beth Clardy
Thursday, August 30, 2018
8:00 AM - Noon
Pre-Session, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts (Academic)
Description: 2018-19 Faculty and Staff Pre-Session
Location: Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
Contact: Kris Wright
10:30 AM
Class of 2022 - Leave for Camp Greystone, Campus Drive in front of Greene & Marsh Halls (Student Life)
Location: Campus Drive in front of Greene & Marsh Halls
Contact: Beth Clardy
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
5:30 PM
Pre-Season Student-Athletes - Leave for Camp Greystone, Campus Drive in front of Greene & Marsh Halls (Student Life)
Location: Campus Drive in front of Greene & Marsh Halls
Contact: Beth Clardy
Friday, August 31, 2018
8:30 AM - 1:30 PM
Class of 2022 - Academic Advisors Meetings, Faculty advisors offices (Student Life)
Location: Faculty advisors offices
Contact: Beth Clardy
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Upperclassmen Move-in (Student Life)
Description: Sophomores, juniors and seniors may begin moving in to their fall housing. Students should check-in with the Office of Residence Life in the Campus Life Building. 
Location: Campus Life Building
Contact: Allen Lollis
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM
Field Day Competition for Class of 2022, Front Lawn of Main Building (Student Life)
Location: Front Lawn, Main Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
9:00 PM
Community Life III: Perspective Launching of Social Events: the First 54 Athletics: How to be Involved, Leonard Auditorium, Main Building (Student Life)
Location: Leonard Auditorium, Main Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
Saturday, September 1, 2018
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection showcases forty-one artists—both native Southerners who recorded their own region and distant places, and others who were transitory visitors or seasonal residents. The result is a varied assortment of individual approaches, and, in the words of the popular American Impressionist Childe Hassam, “some things that are charming.Many of the painters on viewembraced the central tenets of Impressionism: light-filled natural settings loosely painted in high-key colors with visible brushstrokes; fluidity of form; and an emphasis on atmospheric transience. A “scenic impression” is the evocation of something seen, rather than its literal transcription. In terms of subject matter, it is most frequently a landscape, but it can also extend to a figurative composition set outdoors. The artist’s experience—his or her impression of the scene at hand—is paramount. The earliest paintings in the exhibition date from the 1880s and illustrate a Barbizon-inspired aesthetic consisting of dark tones and simple landscapes. Other works postdate Impressionism and display greater concern for expression and form, along with an awareness of the picture plane. 

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, upper level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Exhibit: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras, Richardson Family Art Museum, lower level (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Eras (1603-1912) displays a variety of cultural expressions of Japan, including tea ceremony implements, woodblock prints, porcelains, and ink paintings.  The Edo Period (1603-1868), named after the Shogun capital, is one of the most prosperous and thriving in the history of Japanese art.  The political stability established by the Tokugawa family prompted an increase in artistic, cultural and social development, with flourishing and distinctive aesthetics represented in paintings, ceramics, woodblock prints and decorative arts.  The Meiji Period (1868-1912), an era of radical social and political change from feudalism to modernity and adopted Western influences, witnessed a blending of cultures and an innovative interchange of old ideas and new in Japanese art.  This exhibition intends to further enhance scholarly research for students in ARTH 322 Art of Japan, and several of the labels in this exhibition will be written by students. Featured works are loaned from the Shiro Kuma Collection of Edwin and Rhena Symmes in Atlanta, GA, from the Edmund Daniel Kinzinger (1888-1963) Collection of Japanese Prints loaned by David and Barbara Goist in Asheville, NC, and from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Stokes ('60) in Florence, SC.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum, Lower Level
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Student Tailgate located behind apartment 350 at the shaded area (Student Life)
Description: Wofford Athletics and Recreation (WAR) and Campus Union will be sponsoring a student tailgate for all Wofford College students to attend before the big game against the Citadel. The tailgate will begin at 3:00 pm and will end approximately at 5:45 pm. The tailgate will be located behind apartment 350 at the wooded/shaded area. Come and enjoy some food and fellowship before watching our terriers play! 
Location: Shaded/wooded area behind apartment 350
Contact: Braden Tuttle
5:00 PM
Class of 2022 Terrier Walk/Tunnel for Football Game, Mall behind Main Building (Student Life)
Location: Mall behind Main Building
Contact: Beth Clardy
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Football vs. The Citadel (Athletics)
Description: Football opens the season with their first home game against The Citadel! Check out https://www.ticketreturn.com/prod2/team.asp?SponsorID=11787#.W2nmoVVKiUk to get tickets, or stop by the Ticket Office! Free t-shirts and schedule magnets while supplies last! See you at Gibbs Stadium! 
Location: Gibbs Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
6:15 PM
Cookout for Class of 2022, Gibbs Stadium (Student Life)
Location: Gibbs Stadium
Contact: Beth Clardy
9:00 PM
Welcome Back to School Band Party, Galleria, Michael S. Brown Village Center (Student Life)
Location: Galleria, Michael S. Brown Village Center
Contact: Beth Clardy
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