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Tuesday, October 1, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Fraternity and Sorority Life Hosts Spartanburg Chapter of Special Olympics, Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village (Student Life)
Location: Stewart H. Johnson Greek Village
Contact: Matthew Hammett
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Soccer vs Campbell (Athletics)
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Wednesday, October 2, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday 
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:15 PM - 6:00 PM
a simple meal, Mickel Chapel (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: a simple meal is a brief time of student-led music, prayer, scripture and reflections. Communion and blessings are offered by Rev. Ron. Conversation and a meal of soup and bread follows. Whatever your tradition, all are welcome.
 
Location: Mickel Chapel, Main Building
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Religion, Spirituality, and LGBTQ Life, Olin Theater (multiple cals)
Description: As part of Wofford's OUTober celebration, Rev. Christy Snow will talk about creating a world that honors all beings and leaves no one out. She shares her personal journey growing up in rural North Carolina in a Southern Baptist family where being gay was taught to be an abomination and the effect that this had on her. You will hear about how her life and spiritual views evolved to make room for a bigger idea of God that was all encompassing enough to include all people and how scriptures from many different faith traditions support this expanded idea. 

Sponsors: Cultural Affairs, Dean of Diversity and Inclusion, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Presidential Committee of Diversity and Inclusion, Department of Philosophy, Richardson Family Art Museum, the Chaplain’s Office, and LGBTerriers.
Location: Olin Theater
Contact: Nancy Williams
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Thursday, October 3, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty meeting, Leonard Auditorium (Academic)
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: Matt Cathey
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Art as Transformation: Chapman Lecture by LaToya Ruby Frazier, Jerome Johnson Richardson Theatre (RSRCA) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description: This fall, Wofford welcomes visual artist LaToya Ruby Frazier to campus to deliver a Chapman Lecture in the Humanities. Frazier uses photography, video, and performance art to build visual archives that address industrialism, rustbelt revitalization, environmental justice, healthcare and gender inequality, racism, and family and communal history. 

In her talk, entitled "Art as Transformation: Using Photography for Social Change," Frazier will discuss how she has used photography to fight injustice. Drawing from her book The Notion of Family as well as from works of art by Frederick Douglass, August Sander, Julia Margaret Cameron, and Langston Hughes, she relates her conscious approach to photography, opens up more authentic ways to talk about family, inheritance, and place, and celebrates the inspirational, transformative power of images.

A TED Fellow and one of Ebony's 100 Most Powerful Women of All Time, Frazier has received the MacArthur Genius Fellowship and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. Her work has been widely exhibited across the US and internationally, and her 2015 book The Notion of Family received the International Center for Photography Infinity Award.
Location: Jerome Johnson Richardson Theatre (RSRCA)
Contact: Miriam Thomas
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Friday, October 4, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
9:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Free Flu Shot Clinic, Olin 207A (Student Life)
Description: Free flu shot clinics will be on campus for the month of October. Visit our Instagram @woffordwellness for all of the dates and times, or check the daily announcements. 
Location: Olin 207A
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
12:10 PM - 1:00 PM
Multicultural women plus allies support group for faculty, staff and coaches, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description: This is a safe zone group for women with diverse backgrounds and interests to support, collaborate with, and help each other. Allies are very welcome! Free lunch for all attendees. Come to have a good time and to learn about activities we do off campus.  We are meeting one more time this semester on November 1.
Location: Holcombe room
Contact: Begona Caballero
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Intersection of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Southern Gothic: Intersections of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection

 

From Edgar Allen Poe’s haunting tale of The Gold Bug (1843) to Flannery O'Connor’s biting short story “Good Country People” (1955), the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed the American South’s aberrations, contradictions, and unique sense of dark humor. Drawing exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic examines how nineteenth-and twentieth-century artists borrowed from their literary peers, using a potent visual language to address the tensions between the South’s idyllic visions and its historical realities.This exhibition is guest curated by Elizabeth Driscoll Smith, a Ph.D. candidate from the University California, Santa Barbara, and the Johnson Collection’s 2019 graduate fellow.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursdays - 1 - 9 p.m.
Exhibit closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Women's Soccer vs VMI (Athletics)
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
Saturday, October 5, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection of Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Sunday, October 6, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Women's Soccer vs UNCG (Athletics)
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Monday, October 7, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
Noon - 1:00 PM
Meet and Greet for staff, faculty, coaches and retired colleagues, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description: The second Meet and Greet this semester is on October 7 from noon till around 1pm. We will meet to network and build relationships on campus, while having a good time with a complimentary lunch. There will one more meeting on November 4, also in Gray Jones room. Come and join us!
Location: Holcombe room
Contact: Begona Caballero
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - Noon
Study Abroad Orientation (Visas & Forms), Olin 101 (Academic)
Description:

This orientation is for spring 2020 study abroad students regarding visas and forms preparations. Students will have a general introduction in Olin 101, and then break out into smaller meetings with their program representatives to review program-specific information. All spring 2020 study abroad students are required to attend.

Location: Olin 101
Contact: International Programs
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Therapy Dogs, The Pavilion (Student Life)
Description: Therapy dogs in Wightman Pavilion for you to love and take a little break from stress. 
Come for a minute or for the whole time. 
Pavilion Tuesday, October 8 from 11-1. 
 
Location: Pavilion
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Teachers Talking Teaching, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description: An informal discussion of topics related to teaching, sponsored by the CIL.  This month's topic of discussion is TBD.   
Location: Gray-Jones Room
Contact: Anne Catlla
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Soccer vs Longwood (Athletics)
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Wednesday, October 9, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM
The Transformative Power of Undergraduate Research by Dr. Onarae Rice '96, Papadopoulos (Academic)
Description: Dr. Onarae Rice '96 will present "The Transformative Power of Undergraduate Research."
This is part of The Pedagogy and Power of Undergraduate Research Luncheon Series by the Office of Undergraduate Research and the CIL.
Lunch is provided
RSVP is encouraged since lunch will be provided.
Location: Papadopoulos
Contact: Ramon Galinanes or Anne Catlla
12:30 PM - 1:00 PM
Blessing of the Animals, Patio behind the Galleria (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: Rev. Ron will bless our animals via pictures. Live animals will be there and a sweet treat will be served.
Location: Patio behind the Galleria
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday 
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Introduction to Leading a Faculty-Led Program, Olin 118 (Academic)
Description: Faculty and staff who are interested in learning more about leading a faculty-led study abroad program are encouraged to attend this informational workshop. We'll discuss various models for taking students abroad, timelines, budgeting, marketing, and health & safety considerations. 
Location: Olin 118
Contact: Laura Braun
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:15 PM - 6:00 PM
a simple meal, Mickel Chapel (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: a simple meal is a brief time of student-led music, prayer, scripture and reflections. Communion and blessings are offered by Rev. Ron. Conversation and a meal of soup and bread follows. Whatever your tradition, all are welcome.
 
Location: Mickel Chapel, Main Building
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Thursday, October 10, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Department Chairs meeting, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description: The Department Chairs will meet October 10th in the Holcombe Room.
Location: Holcombe Room
Contact: Dr. Jameica Hill
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
General Education Advisors Meeting: Interim & Registration, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description: General Education advisors will meet to debrief the start of the semester and to look ahead to Interim and Spring 2020 Registration.  Lunch is provided.
Location: Gray-Jones Room
Contact: Carol Wilson
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Free Flu Shot Clinic, Olin 207A (Student Life)
Description: Free flu shot clinics will be on campus for the month of October. Visit our Instagram @woffordwellness for all of the dates and times, or check the daily announcements. 
Location: Olin 207A
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Friday, October 11, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Fall Break (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
9:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Free Flu Shot Clinic, Wellness Center (Student Life)
Description: Free flu shot clinics will be on campus for the month of October. Visit our Instagram @woffordwellness for all of the dates and times, or check the daily announcements. 
Location: Wellness Center
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Women's Soccer vs Western Carolina (Athletics)
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
Saturday, October 12, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Sunday, October 13, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Women's Soccer vs ETSU (Athletics)
Description: Senior Day!
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Monday, October 14, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Homecoming Trivia Night, Lobby of Campus Life Bldg. (Student Life)
Location: Lobby of Campus Life
Contact: Alexa Riley
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Tuesday, October 15, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Registration for Interim 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
(All Day)
Study Abroad Application Deadline (Spring 2020) (Academic)
Description: Students planning to study abroad next semester (Spring 2020) must complete their Wofford study abroad applications by midnight. Late or incomplete applications will not be considered. To access/complete your application, visit: https://wofford.studioabroad.com/
Contact: Office of International Programs
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:45 AM - 12:50 PM
Humanities Lunch, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Location: Holcombe Room
Contact: Anne Rodrick
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Listening Session: Social Sciences GE Requirement Proposal, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Location: Holcombe Room
Contact: Trina Jones
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
DACA: Opportunity, Resilience, Uncertainty, Meadors Multicultural House (Academic)
Description:

Hear powerful testimonies from South Carolina DACA Recipients who are coming to Wofford from nearby institutions. There will be a possibility to take social action after the conversation with the speakers, and a reception to follow. This event is free and open to the public. 

Location: Meadors Multicultural House
Contact: Begona Caballero
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Soccer vs Mercer (Athletics)
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Mr. Wofford, Leonard Auditorium (Student Life)
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: Alexa Riley
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Wednesday, October 16, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Registration for Interim 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
2nd Annual Tailgate, Seal of Main Bldg. (Student Life)
Description: The Space will host our 2nd annual Tailgate on Wednesday, October 16th on the seal in front of Old Main. Free tailgate lunch for the first 100 students the Farmers Table. Space staff will be there to accept resumes as well as provide feedback and support to helping students develop a resume. 

Rain location:  The Space
Location: Seal of Old Main
Contact: Tasha Smith-Tyus
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday 
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Listening Session: Social Sciences GE Requirement Proposal, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Location: Holcombe Room
Contact: Trina Jones
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
MENA Lecture Series Talk: Islam and Globalization Dr. Damrel, McMillan Theater (Academic)
Description:

Islam and Globalization: Lessons from the Silk Road Then and Now

What can the fabled Silk Road – the vast and varied trade route that bound the Muslim world with east Asia and Europe for centuries – teach us about globalization and how religions and cultures affect one another? And what are the implications of the modern Chinese initiative to revive the Silk Road for Muslim religious life across Asia in the 21st century?

Location: McMillan Theater
Contact: Courtney Dorroll
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
US Latino Digital Humanities: An Interactive Overview, Olin 101 (multiple cals)
Description: Professor Isis Campos is Research Fellow, with the Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage project at the University of Houston, will give an interactive overview of the digital humanities work of the Recovery Project. The Recovery Project seeks to locate and preserve the US Latino literary heritage and to disseminate its cultural projects. Professor Campos will share how the Recovery Project has worked to establish the first US center for Latinx DH and how it uses DH to amplify its work. Attendees are encouraged to bring laptops or tablets to explore the sites Professor Campos shares. 
Location: Olin 101
Contact: Laura Barbas-Rhoden
5:15 PM - 6:00 PM
a simple meal, Mickel Chapel (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: a simple meal is a brief time of student-led music, prayer, scripture and reflections. Communion and blessings are offered by Rev. Ron. Conversation and a meal of soup and bread follows. Whatever your tradition, all are welcome.
 
Location: Mickel Chapel, Main Building
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
7:00 PM
Founder's Day Celebration at Fr8Yrd, Fr8Yrd- Downtown Spartanburg (Student Life)
Location: Fr8Yrd- Downtown Spartanburg
Contact: Alexa Riley
Thursday, October 17, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Board of Trustees (multiple cals)
Contact: David Beacham
(All Day)
Registration for Interim 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty Forum, Olin101 (Academic)
Location: Olin 101
Contact: Matt Cathey
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
7:00 PM
Curator's Talk by Elizabeth Smith, Southern Gothic: Intersections of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Homecoming Carnival, Horseshoe behind Main Bldg. (Student Life)
Location: Horseshoe (Behind Old Main)
Contact: Alexa Riley
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Friday, October 18, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Board of Trustees (multiple cals)
Contact: David Beacham
(All Day)
Registration for Interim 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
(All Day)
Homecoming 2019 (Alumni and Development)
Description: Save the date for Homecoming 2019! More information will be available by summer 2019 at wofford.edu/homecoming. 
Contact: Wofford College Alumni Association
(All Day)
Mid-Term (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
11:30 AM
Groundbreaking of the new Chandler Center for Environmental Studies (multiple cals)
Description: Please join us for the groundbreaking of the new Chandler Center for Environmental Studies Center at 11:30 a.m. The event will be held near the construction site between the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts and the Roger Milliken Science Center. Lunch on the lawn of Main Building will follow at 11:45 a.m.

The Bruwell Building and the Galleria in the Michael S. Brown Village Center will be closed during the ceremony. Those who need to eat sooner than 11:45 a.m. should visit Zachs, which will open for lunch at 11 a.m.
Contact: Wofford News
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Intersection of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Southern Gothic: Intersections of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection

 

From Edgar Allen Poe’s haunting tale of The Gold Bug (1843) to Flannery O'Connor’s biting short story “Good Country People” (1955), the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed the American South’s aberrations, contradictions, and unique sense of dark humor. Drawing exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic examines how nineteenth-and twentieth-century artists borrowed from their literary peers, using a potent visual language to address the tensions between the South’s idyllic visions and its historical realities.This exhibition is guest curated by Elizabeth Driscoll Smith, a Ph.D. candidate from the University California, Santa Barbara, and the Johnson Collection’s 2019 graduate fellow.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursdays - 1 - 9 p.m.
Exhibit closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Faculty-Staff Learning Community meeting, Olin 115A (Academic)
Description: This is the second meeting of the Faculty-Staff Learning Community on Networked Community Engagement: Community-Based Praxis and Research.  New participants are welcome, so if you weren’t able to attend the September meeting, you are still welcome to join the conversation.
Location: Olin 115A
Contact: Laura Barbas-Rhoden and Jessalyn Story
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Homecoming Open Mic-Night, Galleria (Student Life)
Location: Galleria @ Michael S. Brown Village Center
Contact: Alexa Riley
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Volleyball vs Chattanooga (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
Saturday, October 19, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
10:30 AM
Curator's Corner: 50 & Forward at Sandor Teszler Library (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description: The library celebrates its 50th anniversary this year!  While you're visiting campus for Homecoming, come home to the library and see the exhibit and talk to the exhibit curators.
Location: Sandor Teszler Library
Contact: Phillip Stone
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection of Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Football vs Western Carolina (Athletics)
Description: Homecoming!
Location: Gibbs Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
Sunday, October 20, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Monday, October 21, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Mid-Term Grades Due at 5:30 p.m. (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Listening Session: Social Sciences GE Requirement Proposal, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Location: Holcombe Room
Contact: Trina Jones
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Dr. Tyrone Hayes Talk, Leonard Auditorium (Academic)
Description: Talk by Dr. Tyrone Hayes, Professor of Integrative Biology at U.C. Berkeley.  Dr. Hayes studies the role of steroid hormones on frog development.  His work has been instrumental in discovering low certain herbicides act as endocrine disruptors, dramatically affecting reproductive development.  
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: Dr. John Moeller
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Movie Night: Halloweentown, Horseshoe behind Main Bldg. (Student Life)
Description: Join us in the Horseshoe at 7pm to watch Halloweentown!!! Come for free candy and to get into the Halloween Spirit!!! Take a break from studying and bring some friends to celebrate spooky season!! 
Location: Horseshoe behind Main Bldg.
Contact: Calhoun Cheek
8:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Entrepreneurship Meet-up, The Space (Student Life)
Description: Join us for a community gathering of Wofford’s innovators and entrepreneurs. If you’re interested in learning more about entrepreneurship at Wofford, operating your own startup company or anywhere in between, this meet-up is for you. Come out and get connected to a welcoming and supportive community of student entrepreneurs and innovators. All are welcome - Food and drinks will be catered - Register to attend on Handshake. Contact Tyler Senecal at senecaltj@wofford.edu for more information.
Location: The Space
Contact: Tyler Senecal
Tuesday, October 22, 2019
(All Day)
Add/Drop for Interim 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - Noon
Study Abroad Orientation (Nuts & Bolts), Harley Room (Academic)
Description: This orientation is for students studying abroad in spring 2020 regarding general preparations for international travel, such as: banking, flights, packing, and other logistical matters. Returned study abroad students will also be present to share insights and suggestions with current applicants. All spring 2020 study abroad students are required to attend.
Location: Harley Room, Richardson Athletic Building
Contact: International Programs
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
FDC Faculty Research & Scholarship Talks, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description: Join us to hear from faculty who were on sabbatical last year.
Location: Gray-Jones Room
Contact: Anne Catlla
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
Noon - 1:00 PM
Study Abroad Orientation (Alumni Advising), Harley Room (Academic)
Description: The office of international programs invites study abroad alumni to lunch to connect them with our spring 2020 study abroad applicants. During this event, spring 2020 students will have the opportunity to speak to students who have studied with their program and/or in their location in previous semesters. All spring 2020 study abroad students are required to attend. 
Location: Harley Room, Richardson Athletic Building
Contact: International Programs
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
6:45 PM - 7:45 PM
Marvelous Metals, RMSC122 (Academic)
Description: Join thousands of students and early career chemists from around the world for this FREE, one-night only event during National Chemistry Week. Discover how chemists are developing new technologies using metals at the intersection of organic and inorganic chemistry. From innovations in medical imaging and theranostics to fundamental changes to the way we create everyday necessities like clothing, food, and energy, these scientists will demonstrate how we can harness the power of our “marvelous metals.”
Location: RMSC122
Contact: Dr. Zachary Davis
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Soccer vs VMI (Athletics)
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Wednesday, October 23, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Add/Drop for Interim 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
Noon - 2:00 PM
CIL Mindfulness Pedagogy Workshop, Olin 207A (Academic)
Location: Olin 207A
Contact: Anne Catlla
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday 
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
MENA Lecture Series: Making Order out of Chaos: Rebel Governance and the Syrian Conflict Dr. Gilbert, McMillan Theater (Academic)
Description:

Making Order out of Chaos: Rebel Governance and the Syrian Conflict

Since 2011 Syria has been rocked by violence and bloodshed. The international press has highlighted the atrocities of ISIS, the use of chemical weapons, and the role that foreign states, such as Russia, have played. While these are all extremely important issues, they give rise to a misperception about life on the ground in Syria. Amidst violence and chaos new institutions emerged to provide public goods and governance in rebel controlled areas. In a country that had known authoritarianism for decades, some cities and towns held democratic elections, had public meetings to discuss affairs, and secured a place for women at the table. This talk will discuss this process, its effects, and some of the potential long-term ramifications of local governance in Syria.

 

Location: McMillan Theater
Contact: Courtney Dorroll
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:15 PM - 6:00 PM
a simple meal, Mickel Chapel (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: a simple meal is a brief time of student-led music, prayer, scripture and reflections. Communion and blessings are offered by Rev. Ron. Conversation and a meal of soup and bread follows. Whatever your tradition, all are welcome.
 
Location: Mickel Chapel, Main Building
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Thursday, October 24, 2019
(All Day)
Add/Drop for Interim 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - Noon
Listening Session: Social Sciences GE Requirement Proposal, Main Building, Room 126 (Academic)
Location: Main Building, Room 126
Contact: Trina Jones
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Farmer's Table: Tasty Thursday, Seal of Main Building (Student Life)
Description: Join us on the seal of Old Main from 11am-1pm for brunch from the Farmer's Table food truck! The first 75 students eat free! 
Location: Seal of Old Main
Contact: Calhoun Cheek
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:45 AM - 1:00 PM
Chemistry Department-Periodic Table Luncheon, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description: Please join the Chemistry Department for the Periodic Table Luncheon.
This is a time for fellowship for all interested in Chemistry. This is a bring your own lunch event with desserts provided.
Location: Gray-Jones Room
Contact: Susan Thomas
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Friday, October 25, 2019
(All Day)
Add/Drop for Interim 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Family Weekend 2019 (Alumni and Development)
Description: Save the date for Family Weekend! More information we be available during summer 2019. Contact Thom Henson, Director of Parent Engagement, for details. 
Location: Wofford College campus
Contact: Thom Henson
(All Day)
Showcase of Undergraduate Research, Front lobby, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts (Academic)
Description: Posters showcasing undergraduate research projects – ranging in topics from the effects of the Ebola virus on our immune system to the mathematics of gerrymandering – will be on display. 
 

Location: Front lobby, Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts
Contact: Dr. Ramon Galinanes Jr.
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Intersection of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Southern Gothic: Intersections of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection

 

From Edgar Allen Poe’s haunting tale of The Gold Bug (1843) to Flannery O'Connor’s biting short story “Good Country People” (1955), the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed the American South’s aberrations, contradictions, and unique sense of dark humor. Drawing exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic examines how nineteenth-and twentieth-century artists borrowed from their literary peers, using a potent visual language to address the tensions between the South’s idyllic visions and its historical realities.This exhibition is guest curated by Elizabeth Driscoll Smith, a Ph.D. candidate from the University California, Santa Barbara, and the Johnson Collection’s 2019 graduate fellow.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursdays - 1 - 9 p.m.
Exhibit closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Student/Parent Dinner, The Galleria (Student Life)
Location: The Galleria
Contact: Carter Gilmore
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Student/Parent Talent Show, Galleria (Student Life)
Location: The Galleria
Contact: Carter Gilmore
Saturday, October 26, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Fall Hospitality Day #2 (Admission)
Description: https://begin.wofford.edu/register/FallHospitalityDaySept19
 

Enjoy an informative day as you tour the campus with Wofford students, attend special interest sessions, and cheer on the Terriers. You will also benefit from the opportunity to meet other high school students and families as they engage in the college search process.

Hospitality Days are offered each Fall and Spring.


Location: Various Locations on Campus
Contact: Mary Carman Jordan
9:00 AM
5k Fun Run, Seal of Main Building (Student Life)
Location: Old Main
Contact: Carter Gilmore
9:00 AM
Curator's Talk by Lydia Estes: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
10:30 AM
Curator's Corner: 50 & Forward at Sandor Teszler Library (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description: The library celebrates its 50th anniversary this year!  While you're visiting campus for Family Weekend, come to the library and see the exhibit and talk to the exhibit curators.
Location: Sandor Teszler Library
Contact: Phillip Stone
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection of Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Football vs Chattanooga (Athletics)
Description: Family Weekend!
Location: Gibbs Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
Sunday, October 27, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Halloween Glow in the Dark Skate Party, Sk8erz Family Fun Center 415 Sha Lane (Student Life)
Description: Free FUN for EVERYONE (while supplies last)
Location: Sk8erz Family Fun Center 415 Sha Lane
Contact: Destiny Shippy
Monday, October 28, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
2019 International Programs Photo Contest (Academic)
Description: Students that participated in a Wofford-approved study abroad program during Fall 2018, Spring 2019, or Summer 2019 are invited to submit their best photos from abroad in the 2019 International Programs Photo Contest. First prize: $250! Submissions are due by 5 pm on Monday, November 11th. For further information and to access the photo release form, visit: https://www.wofford.edu/academics/international-programs/student-resources/welcome-home/international-programs-photo-contest
Location: Office of International Programs
Contact: International Programs
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Bicentenary Celebration of the Birth of The Báb, Leonard Auditorium (multiple cals)
Description: Please join us for the 200th year celebration of the birth of The Báb, the forerunner of the The Bahá’í Faith. As a faith tradition that values diversity in all of its forms, the Spartanburg Bahá’is welcome all members of the Wofford community to one of its most important celebrations – regardless of the religious affiliation (or non-affiliation) of the attendees. This event, featuring Dr. Hoda Mahmoudi (Research Professor and Bahá’í Chair for World Peace at the University of Maryland, College Park), is co-sponsored by the Bahá’is of Spartanburg City and the offices of religious and spiritual life at Wofford, Converse, and Southern Methodist colleges. 
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: Ron Robinson
Tuesday, October 29, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Curriculum Committee, RMSC 221 (Academic)
Location: RMSC 221
Contact: Stefanie Baker
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
Noon - 1:00 PM
Lunch Faculty Talk Series, Gray-Jones Room (Other)
Description:

Presenter: Dr. Jeremy Henkel (Department of Philosophy)

Title: What did Kant really say about lying?

Abstract: Immanuel Kant has long been criticized for arguing that you may not lie even to save your innocent friend from a murderer. Kant scholars have recently argued that Kant has been unfairly maligned, that a careful reading of the text reveals his actual view to be much more subtle and defensible. In this talk he will argue that these scholars are correct that Kant’s view is more subtle than the traditional reading admits but that they are too sanguine about the defensibility of this recovered view. 


Lunch provided for faculty attendees. Sponsored by the Provost Office.


Location: Gray-Jones Room, Burwell Bldg.
Contact: Nancy Williams
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Work and Teach Abroad, Office of Int'l Programs (Academic)
Description: Students interested in interning, teaching, and/or volunteering abroad after graduation should attend this panel. Presenters from English for Life TESOL certificate program, the Office of International Programs, and recent graduates who are or have worked abroad will present on opportunities for working abroad and their own experiences.
Location: Office of International Programs Mezzanine (Michael S. Brown Village Center)
Contact: International Programs
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Soccer vs Furman (Athletics)
Description: Senior Night!
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Wednesday, October 30, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Pumpkin Carving, Seal of Main Bldg. (Student Life)
Location: Old Main
Contact: Carter Gilmore
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday 
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
MENA Lecture Series: Situating the Arabian Gulf: An Anthropologist’s Perspective, McMillan Theater (Academic)
Description:

Situating the Arabian Gulf: An Anthropologist’s Perspective

The Arabian Gulf (sometimes called the Persian Gulf) sits between Arabia and Persia and in easy reach of Africa and India.  What has this meant for the states along its shores?  Sharon Nagy, an ethnographer with over a decade of experience in the Arabian Gulf States, reflects on how the unique location and flows through the Gulf have shaped the society and cultures, and influenced her work.

Location: McMillan Theater
Contact: Courtney Dorroll
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:15 PM - 6:00 PM
a simple meal, Mickel Chapel (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: a simple meal is a brief time of student-led music, prayer, scripture and reflections. Communion and blessings are offered by Rev. Ron. Conversation and a meal of soup and bread follows. Whatever your tradition, all are welcome.
 
Location: Mickel Chapel, Main Building
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
7:00 PM
Hipp Lecture Series: Major Garrett, Leonard Auditoroium (Academic)
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: Laura Corbin
Thursday, October 31, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - Noon
How can teaching for equity serve all Wofford students? Olin 101 (Academic)
Description: In this talk, Tema Okun and Krista Robinson-Lyles of Teach.Equity.Now will take a closer look at what teaching for equity looks like and invite an exploration of how equity benefits all students.  Teach.Equity.Now offers programming to support faculty, staff, and students who take teaching and learning seriously. The program supports participants to grow their skills in navigating issues of race and equity in the classroom, through the curriculum, and on campus while building a strong and diverse learning community.  This talk is open to all faculty, staff, and students.
Location: Olin 101
Contact: Anne Catllá and Begoña Caballero
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Interim 2020 Travel/Study Sponsor Pre-Departure Information Session, Olin 207A (Academic)
Description: All Interim 2020 travel/study sponsors should attend one of the pre-departure information sessions (offered on October 31 and November 19). Important health and safety information will be shared. We'll see you there!
Location: Olin 207A
Contact: Laura Braun
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
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