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Friday, November 1, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Last Day to Withdraw Pass (WP) (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
12:10 PM - 1:00 PM
Multicultural women plus allies support group for faculty, staff and coaches, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description: This is a safe zone group for women with diverse backgrounds and interests to support, collaborate with, and help each other. Allies are very welcome! Free lunch for all attendees. Come to have a good time and to learn about activities we do off campus.  
Location: Holcombe room
Contact: Begona Caballero
12:25 PM - 1:00 PM
All Saints Tolling of the Bell, Seal of Main Bldg. (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: The college bell will toll for all alumni and friends that have passed in the last year. 
Location: Seal of Main Building
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Intersection of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Southern Gothic: Intersections of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection

 

From Edgar Allen Poe’s haunting tale of The Gold Bug (1843) to Flannery O'Connor’s biting short story “Good Country People” (1955), the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed the American South’s aberrations, contradictions, and unique sense of dark humor. Drawing exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic examines how nineteenth-and twentieth-century artists borrowed from their literary peers, using a potent visual language to address the tensions between the South’s idyllic visions and its historical realities.This exhibition is guest curated by Elizabeth Driscoll Smith, a Ph.D. candidate from the University California, Santa Barbara, and the Johnson Collection’s 2019 graduate fellow.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursdays - 1 - 9 p.m.
Exhibit closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Volleyball vs UNCG (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
Saturday, November 2, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
SoCon Undergraduate Research Forum (SURF) (Academic)
Description: Fourth Annual SoCon Undergraduate Research Forum (SURF). 
Location: Milliken Science Center
Contact: Dr. Ramon Galinanes, Jr.
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection of Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Volleyball vs Furman (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
Sunday, November 3, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
SoCon Undergraduate Research Forum (SURF), Roger Milliken Science Center (Academic)
Description: Fourth Annual SoCon Undergraduate Research Forum (SURF) 
Location: Milliken Science Center
Contact: Dr. Ramon Galinanes, Jr.
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Monday, November 4, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
First Generation College Student Celebration Week (Other)
Contact: James Stukes
Noon - 1:00 PM
Meet and Greet for staff, faculty, coaches and retired colleagues, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description: Join us for the Meet and Greet event from noon till around 1pm. We will meet to network and build relationships on campus, while having a good time with a complimentary lunch. 
Location: Holcombe room
Contact: Begona Caballero
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Tuesday, November 5, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Registration for Spring 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
11:00 AM - Noon
Study Abroad Orientation (Health & Safety), Olin 101 (Academic)
Description: At this orientation for spring 2020 study abroad students, students will receive an overview of general health and safety topics, such as: medications, immunizations, mental health, medical forms, preventing theft while abroad, etc. Professionals from the Wellness Center will be available to answer any questions. All spring 2020 study abroad students are required to attend. 
Location: Olin 101
Contact: International Programs
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Teachers Talking Teaching, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description: An informal discussion of topics related to teaching, sponsored by the CIL.  This month's topic of discussion is on Self-Care as Pedagogy.
Location: Gray-Jones Room
Contact: Anne Catlla
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Basketball vs Erskine (Athletics)
Description: Home Opener!
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Wednesday, November 6, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Registration for Spring 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday 
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:15 PM - 6:00 PM
a simple meal, Mickel Chapel (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: a simple meal is a brief time of student-led music, prayer, scripture and reflections. Communion and blessings are offered by Rev. Ron. Conversation and a meal of soup and bread follows. Whatever your tradition, all are welcome.
 
Location: Mickel Chapel, Main Building
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Thursday, November 7, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Registration for Spring 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
11:00 AM - Noon
South Carolina Washington Semester Information Session, Office of Int'l Programs (Academic)
Description: The South Carolina Washington Semester Internship Program (https://www.sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/honors_college/experience/internships/washington_semester/) gives students in universities and colleges across the state of South Carolina the opportunity to spend a semester working and taking classes in Washington DC, gaining valuable experience while earning academic credit toward their degrees. A representative of the program will be on campus to share more information about the program, application dates, and to answer questions.
Location: Office of International Programs (Michael S. Brown Village Center), OIP/CCBL Lounge
Contact: International Programs
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty meeting, Leonard Auditorium (Academic)
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: Matt Cathey
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
New Event  8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Wofford Theatre Presents Circle Mirror Transformation, Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Wofford Theatre opens its 50th season this fall with a production of “Circle Mirror Transformation” by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker. Prof. Dan Day directs two alternating casts of Wofford students in this play, which runs from Nov. 7-9 and 13-16 in the Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre, at 8 p.m. nightly.

“Circle Mirror Transformation” takes place in the fictional town of Shirley, Vermont, where five characters from very different walks of life come together for an acting class. As the students and their eccentric teacher perform acting exercises together, they slowly come to make discoveries about themselves and about one another. The creative process engenders unexpected personal challenges for the group, as relationships are tested and long-hidden truths are revealed. 

Seating for this show will be limited, and discounted tickets may be purchased in advance at www.wofford.edu/boxoffice. Same-day online ticket sales close at 6 p.m., and the box office opens at 7 p.m. in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Wofford students may now see our shows for free on Thursday evenings! Present your valid Wofford ID at the box office — one ticket per student, while seats are available. Free tickets may not be reserved in advance.

No late seating is permitted. Unclaimed tickets are released for resale five minutes prior to showtime.
Location: Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre
Contact: Miriam Thomas
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Friday, November 8, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Registration for Spring 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Intersection of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Southern Gothic: Intersections of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection

 

From Edgar Allen Poe’s haunting tale of The Gold Bug (1843) to Flannery O'Connor’s biting short story “Good Country People” (1955), the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed the American South’s aberrations, contradictions, and unique sense of dark humor. Drawing exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic examines how nineteenth-and twentieth-century artists borrowed from their literary peers, using a potent visual language to address the tensions between the South’s idyllic visions and its historical realities.This exhibition is guest curated by Elizabeth Driscoll Smith, a Ph.D. candidate from the University California, Santa Barbara, and the Johnson Collection’s 2019 graduate fellow.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursdays - 1 - 9 p.m.
Exhibit closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Volleyball vs Western Carolina (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
New Event  8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Wofford Theatre Presents Circle Mirror Transformation, Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Wofford Theatre opens its 50th season this fall with a production of “Circle Mirror Transformation” by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker. Prof. Dan Day directs two alternating casts of Wofford students in this play, which runs from Nov. 7-9 and 13-16 in the Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre, at 8 p.m. nightly.

“Circle Mirror Transformation” takes place in the fictional town of Shirley, Vermont, where five characters from very different walks of life come together for an acting class. As the students and their eccentric teacher perform acting exercises together, they slowly come to make discoveries about themselves and about one another. The creative process engenders unexpected personal challenges for the group, as relationships are tested and long-hidden truths are revealed. 

Seating for this show will be limited, and discounted tickets may be purchased in advance at www.wofford.edu/boxoffice. Same-day online ticket sales close at 6 p.m., and the box office opens at 7 p.m. in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Wofford students may now see our shows for free on Thursday evenings! Present your valid Wofford ID at the box office — one ticket per student, while seats are available. Free tickets may not be reserved in advance.

No late seating is permitted. Unclaimed tickets are released for resale five minutes prior to showtime.
Location: Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre
Contact: Miriam Thomas
Saturday, November 9, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
5K for Karl, Seal of Main Bldg. (Student Life)
Description:

Annual 5K run/walk to benefit the Karl Alexander Memorial scholarship.

Location: Seal in front of Old Main
Contact: Dave Pittman
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection of Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Volleyball vs ETSU (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Basketball vs High Point (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
New Event  8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Wofford Theatre Presents Circle Mirror Transformation, Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Wofford Theatre opens its 50th season this fall with a production of “Circle Mirror Transformation” by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker. Prof. Dan Day directs two alternating casts of Wofford students in this play, which runs from Nov. 7-9 and 13-16 in the Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre, at 8 p.m. nightly.

“Circle Mirror Transformation” takes place in the fictional town of Shirley, Vermont, where five characters from very different walks of life come together for an acting class. As the students and their eccentric teacher perform acting exercises together, they slowly come to make discoveries about themselves and about one another. The creative process engenders unexpected personal challenges for the group, as relationships are tested and long-hidden truths are revealed. 

Seating for this show will be limited, and discounted tickets may be purchased in advance at www.wofford.edu/boxoffice. Same-day online ticket sales close at 6 p.m., and the box office opens at 7 p.m. in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Wofford students may now see our shows for free on Thursday evenings! Present your valid Wofford ID at the box office — one ticket per student, while seats are available. Free tickets may not be reserved in advance.

No late seating is permitted. Unclaimed tickets are released for resale five minutes prior to showtime.
Location: Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre
Contact: Miriam Thomas
Sunday, November 10, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Monday, November 11, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
DEADLINE: 2019 International Programs Photo Contest (Academic)
Description: Students that participated in a Wofford-approved study abroad program during Fall 2018, Spring 2019, or Summer 2019 are invited to submit their best photos from abroad in the 2019 International Programs Photo Contest. First prize: $250! Submissions are due by 5 pm on Monday, November 11th. For further information and to access the photo release form, visit: https://www.wofford.edu/academics/international-programs/student-resources/welcome-home/international-programs-photo-contest
Location: Office of International Programs
Contact: International Programs
11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Blood Mobile, Front of Main Building (Student Life)
Description: Please come and give the gift of Life as the Blood Mobile is here today in front of Main Building 
Location: in front of Main Building
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Tuesday, November 12, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Add/Drop Opens for Spring 2020 (Academic)
Contact: Registrar
11:00 AM - Noon
Interim 2020 Travel/Study Student Pre-Departure Orientation, Leonard Auditorium (Academic)
Description: All students who will be participating in an Interim 2020 travel/study program are required to attend a mandatory pre-departure orientation session to prepare for their upcoming travels.
Location: Leonard Auditorium
Contact: International Programs
11:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Curriculum Committee, RMSC 221 (Academic)
Location: RMSC 221
Contact: Stefanie Baker
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:30 AM - 12:45 PM
The Pedagogy and Power of Undergraduate Research Luncheon Series, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description: This is the second event in The Pedagogy and Power of Undergraduate Research Luncheon Series. Sponsored by the Office of Undergraduate Research and the Center for Innovation and Learning. Complimentary lunch will be provided. 
Location: Gray-Jones Room
Contact: Anne Catlla or Ramon Galinanes, Jr.
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Basketball vs William and Mary (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Wednesday, November 13, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday 
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:00 PM
Exhibit Talk: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:15 PM - 6:00 PM
a simple meal, Mickel Chapel (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: a simple meal is a brief time of student-led music, prayer, scripture and reflections. Communion and blessings are offered by Rev. Ron. Conversation and a meal of soup and bread follows. Whatever your tradition, all are welcome.
 
Location: Mickel Chapel, Main Building
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Volleyball vs The Citadel (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Poet Morri Creech, Olin Theater (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description: Award-winning poet Morri Creech will read and discuss his poetry.
Location: Olin Theater
Contact: Deno Trakas
New Event  8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Wofford Theatre Presents Circle Mirror Transformation, Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Wofford Theatre opens its 50th season this fall with a production of “Circle Mirror Transformation” by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker. Prof. Dan Day directs two alternating casts of Wofford students in this play, which runs from Nov. 7-9 and 13-16 in the Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre, at 8 p.m. nightly.

“Circle Mirror Transformation” takes place in the fictional town of Shirley, Vermont, where five characters from very different walks of life come together for an acting class. As the students and their eccentric teacher perform acting exercises together, they slowly come to make discoveries about themselves and about one another. The creative process engenders unexpected personal challenges for the group, as relationships are tested and long-hidden truths are revealed. 

Seating for this show will be limited, and discounted tickets may be purchased in advance at www.wofford.edu/boxoffice. Same-day online ticket sales close at 6 p.m., and the box office opens at 7 p.m. in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Wofford students may now see our shows for free on Thursday evenings! Present your valid Wofford ID at the box office — one ticket per student, while seats are available. Free tickets may not be reserved in advance.

No late seating is permitted. Unclaimed tickets are released for resale five minutes prior to showtime.
Location: Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre
Contact: Miriam Thomas
Thursday, November 14, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Study Abroad Fair, Great Oaks Hall (Academic)
Description:

Students interested in studying abroad should plan to attend the Wofford Study Abroad Fair. Representatives from approved Wofford study abroad programs will be on-hand to answer questions and provide further information on study abroad opportunities. For more information about studying abroad at Wofford, see http://www.wofford.edu/internationalprograms/. There will be fun, festivities, and prizes for all who attend!

Location: Great Oaks Hall, Roger Milliken Science Center
Contact: International Programs
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Department Chairs meeting, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description: The  Department Chairs will meet November 14th in the Holcombe Room.
Location: Holcombe Room
Contact: Dr. Jameica Hill
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
New Event  8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Wofford Theatre Presents Circle Mirror Transformation, Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Wofford Theatre opens its 50th season this fall with a production of “Circle Mirror Transformation” by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker. Prof. Dan Day directs two alternating casts of Wofford students in this play, which runs from Nov. 7-9 and 13-16 in the Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre, at 8 p.m. nightly.

“Circle Mirror Transformation” takes place in the fictional town of Shirley, Vermont, where five characters from very different walks of life come together for an acting class. As the students and their eccentric teacher perform acting exercises together, they slowly come to make discoveries about themselves and about one another. The creative process engenders unexpected personal challenges for the group, as relationships are tested and long-hidden truths are revealed. 

Seating for this show will be limited, and discounted tickets may be purchased in advance at www.wofford.edu/boxoffice. Same-day online ticket sales close at 6 p.m., and the box office opens at 7 p.m. in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Wofford students may now see our shows for free on Thursday evenings! Present your valid Wofford ID at the box office — one ticket per student, while seats are available. Free tickets may not be reserved in advance.

No late seating is permitted. Unclaimed tickets are released for resale five minutes prior to showtime.
Location: Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre
Contact: Miriam Thomas
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Friday, November 15, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
A Day For Wofford (Alumni and Development)
Description:
On Friday, November 15, join alumni, students, parents, faculty, staff and friends and show that you are #ForWofford on A Day for Wofford— a 24-hour giving event to celebrate the collective impact of Terriers like you!

Challenges will be held throughout the day and 
will be available to make your gift go even further!
Contact: Amanda Richardson
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Intersection of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Southern Gothic: Intersections of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection

 

From Edgar Allen Poe’s haunting tale of The Gold Bug (1843) to Flannery O'Connor’s biting short story “Good Country People” (1955), the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed the American South’s aberrations, contradictions, and unique sense of dark humor. Drawing exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic examines how nineteenth-and twentieth-century artists borrowed from their literary peers, using a potent visual language to address the tensions between the South’s idyllic visions and its historical realities.This exhibition is guest curated by Elizabeth Driscoll Smith, a Ph.D. candidate from the University California, Santa Barbara, and the Johnson Collection’s 2019 graduate fellow.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursdays - 1 - 9 p.m.
Exhibit closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
New Event  8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Wofford Theatre Presents Circle Mirror Transformation, Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Wofford Theatre opens its 50th season this fall with a production of “Circle Mirror Transformation” by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker. Prof. Dan Day directs two alternating casts of Wofford students in this play, which runs from Nov. 7-9 and 13-16 in the Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre, at 8 p.m. nightly.

“Circle Mirror Transformation” takes place in the fictional town of Shirley, Vermont, where five characters from very different walks of life come together for an acting class. As the students and their eccentric teacher perform acting exercises together, they slowly come to make discoveries about themselves and about one another. The creative process engenders unexpected personal challenges for the group, as relationships are tested and long-hidden truths are revealed. 

Seating for this show will be limited, and discounted tickets may be purchased in advance at www.wofford.edu/boxoffice. Same-day online ticket sales close at 6 p.m., and the box office opens at 7 p.m. in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Wofford students may now see our shows for free on Thursday evenings! Present your valid Wofford ID at the box office — one ticket per student, while seats are available. Free tickets may not be reserved in advance.

No late seating is permitted. Unclaimed tickets are released for resale five minutes prior to showtime.
Location: Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre
Contact: Miriam Thomas
Saturday, November 16, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
Fall Scholars Day (Admission)
Description:

Participate in an on-campus interview with Wofford students and faculty, enjoy lunch, and attend special interest sessions. 

Scholars Day attendance is by invitation only.

Wofford Scholars Day, November 16, 2019 is reserved for students who plan to apply by November 1 (Early Decision) or November 15 (Early Action), have been nominated, and qualify for our Wofford Scholars Program.

Questions? See our Scholars Day FAQ.  Have additional questions? Contact Megan Tyler, Director of Wofford Scholars Program, at tylermp@wofford.edu.

Location: Various Locations on Campus
Contact: Mary Carman Jordan
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection of Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Football vs Furman (Athletics)
Description: Senior Day!
Location: Gibbs Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
New Event  8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Wofford Theatre Presents Circle Mirror Transformation, Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Wofford Theatre opens its 50th season this fall with a production of “Circle Mirror Transformation” by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker. Prof. Dan Day directs two alternating casts of Wofford students in this play, which runs from Nov. 7-9 and 13-16 in the Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre, at 8 p.m. nightly.

“Circle Mirror Transformation” takes place in the fictional town of Shirley, Vermont, where five characters from very different walks of life come together for an acting class. As the students and their eccentric teacher perform acting exercises together, they slowly come to make discoveries about themselves and about one another. The creative process engenders unexpected personal challenges for the group, as relationships are tested and long-hidden truths are revealed. 

Seating for this show will be limited, and discounted tickets may be purchased in advance at www.wofford.edu/boxoffice. Same-day online ticket sales close at 6 p.m., and the box office opens at 7 p.m. in the Rosalind Sallenger Richardson Center for the Arts. Wofford students may now see our shows for free on Thursday evenings! Present your valid Wofford ID at the box office — one ticket per student, while seats are available. Free tickets may not be reserved in advance.

No late seating is permitted. Unclaimed tickets are released for resale five minutes prior to showtime.
Location: Sallenger Sisters Black Box Theatre
Contact: Miriam Thomas
Sunday, November 17, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Monday, November 18, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Tuesday, November 19, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Interim 2020 Travel/Study Sponsor Pre-Departure Information Session, Olin 207A (Academic)
Description: All Interim 2020 travel/study sponsors should attend one of the pre-departure information sessions (offered on October 31 and November 19). Important health and safety information will be shared. We'll see you there!
Location: Olin 207A
Contact: Laura Braun
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
CIL / D&I Book Club, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description: A book club discussion of the book "Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher" by Stephen Brookfield, sponsored by the CIL and the Dean for Diversity & Inclusion.
Location: Holcombe Room
Contact: Anne Catlla
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Wednesday, November 20, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
Noon - 1:00 PM
Lunch Faculty Talk Series, Gray-Jones Room (Other)
Description:

Presenter: Dr. Katerina Andrews (Department of Economics)

Title: Immigration in Europe

Abstract: We will take a look at the recent patterns of migration to Europe from Middle Eastern and North African countries. What are the economic, demographic, fiscal and labor market effects of immigration on the receiving countries? We will also review the evidence on immigrants’ and refugees’ economic and social adaptation to their host countries. 

 Lunch will be provided for faculty attendees. Sponsored by the Provost Office.

Location: Gray-Jones Room, Burwell Bldg.
Contact: Nancy Williams
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday 
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:15 PM - 6:00 PM
a simple meal, Mickel Chapel (Campus Ministry / Service Learning)
Description: a simple meal is a brief time of student-led music, prayer, scripture and reflections. Communion and blessings are offered by Rev. Ron. Conversation and a meal of soup and bread follows. Whatever your tradition, all are welcome.
 
Location: Mickel Chapel, Main Building
Contact: Elizabeth Fields
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Thursday, November 21, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - Noon
Study Abroad Orientation (What to Expect), Olin 207A (Academic)
Description:

This orientation session for spring 2020 study abroad students will provide an overview of academic and cultural differences that students should expect overseas and will provide students with helpful tips for how to navigate those differences. All spring 2020 study abroad students are required to attend. 

Location: Olin 207A
Contact: International Programs
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty Forum, Olin 101 (Academic)
Location: Olin 101
Contact: Matt Cathey
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Friday, November 22, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
(All Day)
VOTING ENDS: 2019 International Programs Photo Contest (Academic)
Description: Vote now on International Programs' Facebook page (www.facebook.com/wocostudyabroad/) for your favorite photos in the 2019 International Programs Photo Contest! Voting ends at noon today! Winners will be announced this afternoon. 
Location: Office of International Progams
Contact: International Programs
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Intersection of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Southern Gothic: Intersections of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection

 

From Edgar Allen Poe’s haunting tale of The Gold Bug (1843) to Flannery O'Connor’s biting short story “Good Country People” (1955), the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed the American South’s aberrations, contradictions, and unique sense of dark humor. Drawing exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic examines how nineteenth-and twentieth-century artists borrowed from their literary peers, using a potent visual language to address the tensions between the South’s idyllic visions and its historical realities.This exhibition is guest curated by Elizabeth Driscoll Smith, a Ph.D. candidate from the University California, Santa Barbara, and the Johnson Collection’s 2019 graduate fellow.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursdays - 1 - 9 p.m.
Exhibit closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
Saturday, November 23, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection of Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
Sunday, November 24, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Monday, November 25, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Tuesday, November 26, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
11:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Curriculum Committee (Tentative), RMSC 221 (Academic)
Location: RMSC 221
Contact: Stefanie Baker
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:45 AM - 1:00 PM
Chemistry Department-Periodic Table Luncheon, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description:  Please join the Chemistry Department for the Periodic Table Luncheon.  This is a time for fellowship for all interested in Chemistry.  This is a bring your own lunch event with desserts provided.
Location: Gray-Jones Room
Contact: Susan Thomas
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
8:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Insanity Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: AJ Miller
Wednesday, November 27, 2019
(All Day)
Thanksgiving Holiday, Campus Closed (Academic)
Contact: Wofford News
Thursday, November 28, 2019
(All Day)
Thanksgiving Holiday, Campus Closed (Academic)
Contact: Wofford News
Friday, November 29, 2019
(All Day)
Thanksgiving Holiday, Campus Closed (Academic)
Contact: Wofford News
Saturday, November 30, 2019
(All Day)
Art Exhibit: 50 and Forward: The Sandor Teszler Library since 1969 (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Location: Sandor Teszler Library Gallery
Contact: Missy Clapp
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Siendo mujer: a short study of the female experience in South America, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

As the 35th Presidential International Scholar, Lydia Estes attempted to uncover the visual representation of la mujer, or the woman, in the South American countries of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Peru. Siendo mujer means "being a woman", and this exhibition represents the conversations she shared with resilient, creative women for whom art plays a significant role in their female experiences and vice versa--for whom the female experience plays a significant role in their art. 

 

It is further a collection of their artwork, also including her own photographs of them, their spaces, and moments which contribute to the story each is trying to tell through their work.  Her research revealed more questions like, how are women stereotypically portrayed in their societies? How are female artists confronting these images through their own artwork, and how are the mediums they work in an aspect of their protest? And lastly, how will art change the female experience in future South American societies?

October 17 – December 20, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection of Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
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