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Monday, September 23, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Tuesday, September 24, 2019
11:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Curriculum Committee, RMSC 221 (Academic)
Location: RMSC 221
Contact: Stefanie Baker
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Advising Gen Z: Karen Hauschild, Director Academic Advising and Planning Center College of Charleston, Gray-Jones Room (Academic)
Description: Faculty and staff are invited to a lunch presentation and Q&A with Karen Hauschild, exploring the attributes of Generation Z and approaches to advising work with them. Karen is the Director of the Academic Advising and Planning Center at the College of Charleston who has presented on Gen Z both regionally and nationally. She has practical experience in advising as well as administration, anchoring both in advising/student development history.
Location: Gray-Jones Room
Contact: Carol Wilson
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
CIL and D&I Book Club discussion: Whistling Vivaldi, How Stereotypes Affect Us and What Can We do, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description:

The first CIL and Diversity and Inclusion book club meeting for this academic year will be a discussion of “Whistling Vivaldi: How stereotypes Affect Us and What We can Do” by Claude Steele on Tuesday September 24, 11:30-12:50pm in Holcombe room. You are welcome to join the discussion even if you couldn’t read the book.  There are Youtube videos with the author explaining his book.  Please email Begoña Caballero if you would need a copy of the book.

Location: Holcombe room in Burwell
Contact: Begoña Caballero and Anne Catlla
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersections w/Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday - 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
6:30 PM
Real Talk Tuesday: Privilege, Meadors Multicultural House (Student Life)
Description: What is privilege? Join ODI as we participate in "Privilege for Sale" a program that will help us identify privileges we experience, and explore how  they shape our identity and influence the choices we make.
Location: AMS House
Contact: Nadia Glover
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Men's Soccer vs Charlotte (Athletics)
Location: Snyder Field
Contact: Jake Farkas
Wednesday, September 25, 2019
6:30 AM - 7:00 AM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
(All Day)
Dental Interim, RMSC306 (Academic)
Description:
If you are interested in registering for the interim project "An Introduction to Dental Medicine, please sign the list in the Chemistry Department.  Only 8 students can register and you need an override to get in.  Students must have a minimum gpa of 3.2.  Preference will be given to juniors and seniors.  Higher gpas and making your request known earlier will help your chances of getting an override.  



Location: RMSC306
Contact: Dr. Charles Bass
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday 
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Articulating the Study Abroad Experience, Space Conference Room (Academic)
Description: Students who are interested in better defining skills gained from their study abroad experiences on their resumes, in job interviews and on graduate school applications should attend this workshop. Representatives from The Space and The Office of International Programs will discuss ways to better verbalize such experiences for both US and international potential employers and help students explore specific skills gained through study abroad. This info session is a must for all study abroad alums! Free food for student attendees!
Location: The Space Conference Room
Contact: Office of International Programs
Event changed  5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Wofford German Club Oktoberfest, Burwell Dining Hall (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description: Come join the fun upstairs in Burwell to celebrate the Wofford German Club's annual campus-wide Oktoberfest! There will be authentic German food, German Oktoberfest music, decorations, and prizes!

Learn something about German culture and try some great food!

Meet German students from USC Upstate, Converse and local high schools!

 
Location: Burwell Upstairs
Contact: Kirsten Krick-Aigner
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
6:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Cardio Dance Blast Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Turner Bryant
Thursday, September 26, 2019
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Learning to reduce microaggressions, Gray-Jones Room, Burwell Building (Academic)
Description: Reducing microaggressions: From awareness to empowerment Giving Voice is a nationally recognized interactive theatre troupe that addresses various issues of diversity, oppression, and micro-aggressions. Under the direction of Dr. Carol Maples, the troupe uses an engaging approach to improve cultural competence in individuals and their organizations. Giving Voice guides the audience from awareness of oppression people are experiencing to empowerment so they can effectively handle various situations to help make their space safer for everyone. Thursday, Sep. 26 from 11 till 1pm in Gray Jones with lunch included,  and Friday Sep. 27 from 11:30 till 2: 30pm in Meadors Multicultural House with complimentary lunch. 
Location: Gray-Jones Room
Contact: BEGONA CABALLERO
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Tasty Thursday, Seal of Main Building (Student Life)
Description:

Be the first in line to enjoy free food with One Love Fusion Food Truck. First 100 people in line receive will receive free food.

Sponsored by Wofford Activities Council, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life



Location: Seal of Main
Contact: Nadia Glover
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Faculty/Staff Only Yoga, Richardson Dance Studio (Other)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Lisa Lefebvre
11:45 AM - 1:00 PM
Chemistry Department-Periodic Table Luncheon, Holcombe Room (Academic)
Description: Please join the Chemistry Department for the Periodic Table Luncheon.  This is a time for fellowship for all interested in Chemistry. This is a bring your own lunch event with desserts provided.
Location: Holcombe Room, Burwell
Contact: Susan Thomas
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection with Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Pilates Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Eleni Ouzts
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Boot Camp Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: McKenzie Summers
6:00 PM - 6:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
8:00 PM - 11:00 PM
College Fest, Morgan Square in Downtown Spartanburg (Student Life)
Description: Kick off the fall semester at College Fest, a free event welcoming college students into Downtown Spartanburg.

Enjoy a glow dance party with iPartyology, and try food and beverages by local restaurants.

Free food tickets and free t-shirts available to students with a valid college ID from Converse, SCC, Sherman, SMC, USC Upstate, VCOM & Wofford, while supplies last.

21+ beverages available for purchase with valid ID.
Location: Morgan Square in Downtown Spartanburg
Contact: Alexa Riley
Friday, September 27, 2019
11:30 AM - 2:30 PM
Reducing microaggressions: Interactive workshop, Meadors Multicultural House (Academic)
Description:

Giving Voice, a nationally recognized interactive theatre troupe will lead a workshop that addresses various issues of diversity, oppression, and micro-aggressions. Giving Voice guides the audience from awareness of oppression people are experiencing to empowerment, so they can effectively handle various situations to help make their space safer for everyone.  Complimentary lunch for all attendees. RSVPs are appreciated.  

Location: Meadors Multicultural House
Contact: Begona Caballero
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Intersection of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Southern Gothic: Intersections of Art and Literature in the Johnson Collection

 

From Edgar Allen Poe’s haunting tale of The Gold Bug (1843) to Flannery O'Connor’s biting short story “Good Country People” (1955), the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed the American South’s aberrations, contradictions, and unique sense of dark humor. Drawing exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic examines how nineteenth-and twentieth-century artists borrowed from their literary peers, using a potent visual language to address the tensions between the South’s idyllic visions and its historical realities.This exhibition is guest curated by Elizabeth Driscoll Smith, a Ph.D. candidate from the University California, Santa Barbara, and the Johnson Collection’s 2019 graduate fellow.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday - 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursdays - 1 - 9 p.m.
Exhibit closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Tae Kwon Do Club, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Dr. Jeremy Henkel
4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
HIIT Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Abbey Heldreth
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Yoga Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Sophia Moss
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Ab-Lab Fitness Class, Richardson Dance Studio (Student Life)
Location: Richardson Dance Studio
Contact: Liesel Rutland
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Volleyball vs Samford (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
Saturday, September 28, 2019
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight by Lee Ann Harrison-Houser, Richardson Family Art Gallery (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Otherness²: Hiding in Plain Sight explores the outsider’s perspectives and the impact of “Othering.” During the creative process, Harrison-Houser pursues authenticity and begins to reveal untold stories in her work. However, she instinctively hides within the mark-making with her use of symbolism, sgraffito, and abstraction. Layer after layer of gesso and paint erase her disclosures. Subsequently, the art installation shares these stories only in a type of Hide-and-Seek game for the viewer. For deeper connections, the viewer physically moves to a separate space to match the conceptual titles back to the abstract squares. Through this physical movement and mindfulness, the storyteller role shifts away from the artist and moves to the viewer to create awareness, conversation, and the momentum for change.  

September 10- October 12, 2019

Richardson Family Art Gallery
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Gallery
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Props: Personal Identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts, Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

Props: Personal identities in the Portrait Photography of Richard Samuel Roberts

 

The term “props” brings to mind the objects used in the theater that help establish the meaning of a scene. In this theater context, the word is shortened from “properties,” things collectively owned by a theater group. But could the term also reflect the notion that props show “properties” of a character, offering layers of information and meaning to a viewer.? “Props” is also a slang term, meaning “proper respect.” In this show, we analyze the props in photographic portraits taken by RSR between 1920-1936 to see the way that the “props”—most often objects chosen by the sitters themselves—tell us something about the self-identity of the sitters. The objects chosen often underscore the proper respect due the sitters based on their attainments, but also can give insights—in an otherwise very formulaic genre—into the inner desires and predilections of the sitters. Props thus can help us see beyond the surface, or, perhaps conversely, can reify socially-agreed upon tropes.  

 

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Exhibit Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 1 – 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 – 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday

Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (lower level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Art Exhibit: Southern Gothic: Literary Intersection of Art from the Johnson Collection, Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level) (Arts and Cultural (On Campus))
Description:

From the haunting novels of William Faulkner to the gritty short stories of Flannery O'Connor, the Southern Gothic literary tradition has exhumed and examined the American South’s unique mystery, contradictions, and dark humor. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American writers, epitomized by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, sought to reinterpret the Gothic imagination of their European counterparts, dramatizing the cultures and characters of a region in the midst of civil war and its tumultuous aftermath. Decades later, a new generation of authors—including Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Toni Morrison—wove Gothic elements into their own narratives, exploring the complexities of a changing social terrain and the ancient spirits that linger in its corners. 

With works drawn exclusively from the Johnson Collection, Southern Gothic illuminates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists employed a potent visual language to transcribe the tensions between the South’s idyllic aura and its historical realities. Often described as a mood or sensibility rather than a strict set of thematic or technical conventions, features of the Southern Gothic can include horror, romance, and the supernatural. While academic painters such as Charles Fraser and Thomas Noble conveyed the genre’s gloomy tonalities in their canvases, Aaron Douglas and Harry Hoffman grappled with the injustices of a modern world. Other artists, including Alexander Brook and Eugene Thomason, investigated prevailing stereotypes of rural Southerners—a trope often accentuated in Southern Gothic literature. Collectively, these images demonstrate that definitions of the Gothic are neither monolithic nor momentary, inviting us, instead to contemplate how the Southern Gothic legacy continues to inform our understanding of the American South.

September 3 – December 14, 2019

Richardson Family Art Museum (upper level)

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursday: 1 - 9 p.m.
Closed on Sunday and Monday
 
Location: Richardson Family Art Museum (Upper Level)
Contact: Youmi Efurd
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Volleyball vs Mercer (Athletics)
Location: Indoor Stadium
Contact: Jake Farkas
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